The Honey Maker - Greenland © 2014 . All rights reserved.

6 Sep ’14

A place where you would least expect a honey maker is in the town of Narsarsuaq, an ex-military base, used by the Americans as a watchtower between them and the USSR. Ole Guldager is the manager of the local museum, just next to the airport and the Blue Ice café. But when the sun is out, the flowers are blooming and the Greenlanders are walking around in Tees, Ole is taking care of his black bees. Yes, indeed, bees in Greenland, imported from the south of Sweden and Denmark and buzzing around quite happily and content here in this remote corner of the world. The bees are disease-free and to get them here it’s almost like a military action which can’t take longer than 24 hours. You do not just ship a family of bees (of over 50.000 members) from one part of the world to another.

Ole is in fact an archaeologist from Denmark and lived the bigger part of his life here in Greenland. His big dream is to show Greenlanders they can live and survive by making honey, not just any honey, but probably the most organic and healthy honey in the world. Because these happy bees can feast on wild flowers and herbs (from willow, wild thyme, bellflowers, fireweed and angelica…), they do not have to deal with pollution or chemicals, they have bright and strong sun in the summer and a good and restful sleep in the winter. Ole says he can get almost 50 kilo of honey per hive, per family. For the moment he has only six hives but the idea is to expand this and to even start breading a queen bee, the most difficult task for a honey maker. Ole teaches farmers in the area to also learn how to make honey, next to sheep farming. Some of them are successful, others are not.

“The ideal model would be if every farmer, or any Greenlander interested in honey making would have 50 bee hives, he could live very well of it. There would be a good income and more job opportunities.” Says Ole who also claims that bees can live even as north as Ilulissat. Instead of two harvest like here in the south, there will only be one. If you want to taste this amazing honey, you will have to travel here, to the south of Greenland or if you ask Ole he might ship you a pot of his liquid, Arctic gold to your home (mail to og@narsarsuaqmuseum.gl). You will taste and even smell the wild flowers of Greenland. The only risk is you will want to travel to Greenland. But hey, that’s a risk worth taking.

The Honey Maker, Narsarsuaq - Greenland
The Honey Maker, Narsarsuaq - Greenland
View at Narsarsuaq - Greenland

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